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This Japanese company is offering nonsmokers extra vacation days

03 November 2017

"I am no longer shunned by nonsmokers as I have rid myself of the odor of cigarette smoke", said Seto, who has smoked for 30 years.

As a reward for not taking daily smoke breaks, non-smokers at the Japanese company Pilia Inc. now receive an extra six days off each year.

"One of our non-smoking staff put a message in the company suggestion box earlier in the year saying that smoking breaks were causing problems", said Hirotaka Matsushima, a spokesman for the company.

The company's CEO, Takao Asuka, said that he hopes "to encourage employees to quit smoking through incentives rather than penalties or coercion".

After hearing about the complaint, the company's CEO, Takao Asuka, chose to give nonsmoking employees time off to compensate.

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As per a study by World Health Organisation and US Cancer Institute, smoking is costing United States dollars 1 trillion to the world economy, which is way more than global revenues from tobacco taxes.

A Japanese company is offering an unusual perk for its nonsmoking employees: an extra six days of vacation. The figure is higher among males and older generations.

According to the report, there are 120 people in the firm and since September 1 when the programme was launched, 4 out of 42 smokers have quit the habit. However, in Japan, smoking is banned at work places and a common smoking room is constructed for employees to smoke only in that common room.

There are many western countries which encourages smoking in restaurants and work areas.

Japan lags behind other developed nations in terms of smoke-free policies and the social pressure to quit is less intense. A life insurance company in Japan recently announced new antismoking measures, including a ban on smoking on company property and a plan to convert some smoking rooms into other uses.

This Japanese company is offering nonsmokers extra vacation days