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Hampshire Pride chief slams Theresa May over DUP talks

24 June 2017

It was a surprise move - Gove was sacked as justice minister by May past year after his bid to become party leader forced now-foreign minister Boris Johnson from the race, amid accusations of treachery and political backstabbing.

"The people of Britain have had a bellyful of promises and politicking", he wrote in The Sun tabloid. "Now is the time for delivery-and Theresa May is the right person to continue that vital work", he wrote in The Sun tabloid.

After chairing a Cabinet meeting followed by her meeting with the DUP leader at Downing Street, May is set to travel to Paris to hold talks with French President Emmanuel Macron.

Both sides expect a deal to be agreed on Wednesday, which would guarantee the DUP's support for Ms May's minority government on important votes.

They campaigned for Brexit despite the fact that Northern Ireland has the most to lose if there is no amicable deal with the EU.

May's spokesman said it remained government policy to cut net migration to under 100,000 and Brexit Minister David Davis also said walking away without securing a deal with the remaining 27 European Union states remained a possibility.

But Ruth Davidson, the pro-EU leader of the Conservatives in Scotland, called on May to "reopen" the government's Brexit plans.

Meanwhile, the chief European Union negotiator has told the Financial Times that the clock is ticking on Brexit talks, and that Britain should be wary of further delays.

Britain's Press Association, quoting two unnamed sources from the meeting, said May told lawmakers at a closed-door session that she admitted she was the one who "got us into this mess" and vowed that she would be the one who will "get us out of it".

But "being seen to be the prime minister" could help "shore up her authority at home", according to Colin Talbot, professor of government at the University of Manchester.

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She also indicated that there will not be a second general election this year.

May has shown little public contrition for the electoral gamble that backfired spectacularly, but was forced to accept the resignations of her two top aides - reportedly a requirement by cabinet colleagues for allowing her to stay in office.

The British prime minister meant to secure her Brexit mandate when she announced the elections on the 18th of April, because "The country is coming together but Westminster is not".

Speaking straight after a meeting with DUP leader Arlene Foster, the Prime Minister praised the increased diversity in the chamber, noting the record number of LGB MPs as well as the record number of BME MPs, disabled MPs and female MPs.

The prime minister's spokesperson only confirmed an "update on the on-going talks with the DUP" took place as the ministers gathered once again in the wake of last week's disastrous election.

"A broader backing for Brexit has to be built and I think she recognizes that", the MP said after the meeting.

The Conservatives are considering an arrangement in which the DUP backs May on the budget and her confidence motions in return for policies favorable to Northern Ireland — a situation that could lead to huge benefits for a small part of the United Kingdom.

Defense Secretary Michael Fallon said the government was not looking at a formal coalition but would seek assurances that the DUP would vote with May "on the big things". Writing in the mass-circulation Sun newspaper, Johnson stressed that the Conservatives won more votes than at any time since Margaret Thatcher and are still the largest party in Parliament.

Some involved in the Irish peace process are alarmed because the 1998 Good Friday peace accords call for the British government to be neutral in the politics of Northern Ireland.